Kale and Lentil Salad

Here is a salad that I accidentally created today when I was trying to finish off some leftovers... it turned out to be amazingly Delicioso! Yesterday I cooked some sprouted lentils with onions as a quick version of Mjaddara(The Lebanese Lentil Mash dish).  The sprouted version hold their shape much better, so not really as creamy as Mjaddara, but still very tasty.

Here is that recipe.

1. Hoda's Sprouted Lentils with Onion

  • 2 Tbs. extra virgin Olive Oil
  • 1 small organic white Onion, chopped
  • 1/4 c. organic brown Rice
  • 1-1/2 c. hot Green Tea (or boiling water)
  • 2 c. sprouted organic Lentils
  • 1/2 tsp. Sea Salt

Place medium size pot over med heat for 1 minute.  Add onions and saute for 2 minutes stirring occasionally, until lightly brown on edges.

Turn heat to med-low.  Add olive oil and rice, stirring for another 2 minutes. Add water, cover and simmer for 25 minutes.

Add lentils and salt, stirring to mix. Cover and simmer another 10 - 15 minutes, until rice is done and the water absorbed.  You may need to add a little more water after adding lentils if too dry.  There should be enough water at that point to soak but not cover the lentils.

Taste, and adjust salt seasoning.

Sprouted lentils
Sprouted lentils

So this was what I added to my Kale salad which had the following ingredients:

2. Kale, Tomato and Parsley Salad

  • 3 c. organic Kale, chopped
  • 1 organic Tomato, chopped
  • 2 organic Green Onions, chopped
  • 1 c. chopped organic Parsley
  • 1/4 c. chopped organic Mint
  • Juice of 2 lemons
  • 1/2 tsp. cumin
  • 3 Tbs. extra virgin Olive Oil
  • 1 tsp. Sea Salt

Mix it all together.

Combine the two Salads in any ratio that pleases you.

P.S. I ate the combo before I had a chance to take a Photo!  Will update next time I make this. ♥  :)

Lentils and Mung Beans - the Whole Story

There are some days when I get an awfully strong craving for Indian spices. I either want to have a curried dish, or a lentil dish... those are the two competitors for my attention. My favorite dish when I was a girl, is called Mjaddara, a 'peasant' type winter dish popular in the villages of Lebanon.  It's basically a lentil/rice/onion mash that is sooo tasty, sooo comforting and sooo healthy!  That's THREE Soooo's!!  :) Mom was an expert Mjaddara maker, like her father.

According to Choosemyplate.gov...

Health Properties

"Aside from their slight differences in calorie, carb and protein values, red and French lentils have very similar health benefits. Both are protein-rich, plant-based foods, which gives them a unique set of positive nutritional properties.

mung bean sprouts 1
mung bean sprouts 1

According to ChooseMyPlate.gov: low-fat proteins such as lentils are essential for growing, building, repairing and maimaintaining tissues in blood, skin, bone and muscle cells.

Protein is also a particularly satiating nutrient and may be able to keep you full for longer than carb- or fat-rich foods, which can be important if you’re watching your weight. Both red and French lentils are high in dietary fiber, which means they can improve digestive health and potentially lower levels of blood cholesterol and blood sugar."

Mung beans are low in Saturated Fat and Sodium, and very low in Cholesterol. It is also a good source of Protein, Thiamin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Pantothenic Acid, Iron, Magnesium, Phosphorus and Potassium, and a very good source of Dietary Fiber, Vitamin C, Vitamin K, Riboflavin, Folate, Copper and Manganese.

To find out if a carb food you are about to buy (bread, crackers, pasta, etc..) is a healthy choice do the following:

Add a zero to the total grams of fiber per serving, so 2g becomes 20.  Compare it to the total grams of Carbs per serving.  The fiber number should be MORE than the total Carbohydrates number.  This means if a product has 20g of Carbs and 1g of Fiber (i.e. 10) Then put it back on the shelf!There is not enough fiber to slow down the conversion of the carbs into glucose, and it will spike your blood sugar.  These spikes that occur all day long are what predispose us to Diabetes and other diseases.  Aim for at least 1.5 times the Fiber to Carbs.

1 cup of cookedMung beans has 2 grams of Fiber vs. 6 grams of Carbs.  That's 20 vs 6! A very good ratio.

1 cup of Lentils have 16 grams of Fiber vs. 40 grams of Carb...160 to 40!  An Excellent ratio.

And of course we know that a diet high in fiber can help prevent colon and breast cancer. So eat your beans!

I adapted this recipe to include both lentils and mung beans.

Sprouted Lentils and Mung Beans, Indian Style

  • 2 c. sprouted organic brown Lentils
  • 1/2 c. organic Mung Beans (soaked overnight)
  • 2 tsp. extra virgin Olive Oil
  • 3/4 c. organic Onion, chopped
  • 1 green organic Chili Pepper (I use Serrano)
  • A 1-inch piece of organic Ginger
  • 1 Tbs. organic Cilantro, chopped
  • 1/2 tsp. Cayenne Pepper
  • 1/2 tsp. dried Coriander powder
  • 3/4 tsp. Cumin
  • 1/4 tsp. Black Pepper
  • Sea Salt to taste
  • 1-1-1/2 c. hot Water

Heat a medium stainless steel pot over medium heat for 1 minute.  Add oil and wait another 1 minute.

Add onion and chili pepper and saute for 2 minutes. Add ginger and cilantro, stirring for 1 minute.

Add beans and spices and 1 cup hot water, stir, cover and simmer over medium-low for 15 minutes.

Press one of the beans between your fingers to make sure they are done, and add the last 1/2 c. of hot water if too dry.

Adjust seasoning, and serve hot or at room temperature.

lentils_Indian style
lentils_Indian style

~ Cheers! ♥

Are You a Bean? or ... the Lentil Love Affair

Da Facts

The lentil (Lens ensculenta) is a legume that grows in pods containing one or two lentil seeds.  They are believed to have originated in central Asia.

Lentils have been eaten by humans since Neolithic times and were one of the first domesticated crops.  In the Middle East, lentil seeds have been found dating back more than 8000 years.

In the Old Testament, Esau gives up his birthright to Jacob in exchange for a bowl of lentil soup. The Greek playwright Aristophanes called lentil soup the "sweetest of delicacies." Lentils have been found in Egyptian tombs dating as far back as 2400 BC.

In India, the lentil is known as dal or daal. For many centuries, lentils were considered to be "the poor man's meat." In Catholic countries, those who couldn't afford fish would eat lentils during Lent instead.

There are many varieties and colors of lentils, including brown, yellow, black, orange, red and green.  Beluga lentils are black and one of the smallest varieties of lentils, having an appearance similar to caviar.

French green lentils are small, delicate, and flavorful and hold their shape after cooking better than many other types of lentil. The most common lentils used in the United States are green and brown, since these varieties are best at retaining their shape after cooking.

The optical lens is named after the Latin word for lentil, lens. Unlike most other beans, lentils don't need to be soaked before cooking.

More Facts

With about 30% of their calories from protein, lentils have the third-highest level of protein, by weight, of any legume or nut, after soybeans and hemp. Proteins include the essential amino acids isoleucine and lysine , and lentils are an essential source of inexpensive protein in many parts of the world which have large vegetarian populations.

Lentils are deficient in two essential amino acids, methionine and cysteine. However, sprouted lentils contain sufficient levels of all essential amino acids, including methionine and cysteine.

Lentils also contain dietary fiber, folate, vitamin B1, and minerals. Red (or pink) lentils contain a lower concentration of fiber than green lentils (11% rather than 31%). Health magazine has selected lentils as one of the five healthiest foods. Lentils are often mixed with grains, such as rice, which results in a complete protein dish.

   References:

Randy Sell. "Lentil". North Dakota State University Department of Agricultural Economics. Archived from the original on 2009-06-21. Retrieved 2011-12-14.

Raymond, Joan (March 2006). "World's Healthiest Foods: Lentils (India)". Health Magazine.

Da Story

As a child and up to now, lentils have been one of my favorite beany legumes! There are two traditional Lebanese lentil dishes that Mom made quite often, and that I devoured... 1) Mjaddara : a lentil and rice mash that is better than chocolate fudge; and 2) Shawrabit Adas: 'Lentil Soup' with Swiss Chard and Cumin.

Both dishes were on the Top of my Comfort Foods list.  On wintry days when I visited my Uncle Yusef's house where Tehta (Grandma) lived, we'd huddle around their kerosene stove in the 'winter room', sitting on long cushions that bordered the wall, and eat bowls of Mjaddara with pita bread, pickles and shredded cabbage salad. My 3 cousins and I would listen to the adult conversations, poking fun at whoever was featured in each story, or play silly word games.

Lentils are versatile.  You can add them to salads, to chilies, and soups.

Click on the Recipe Names to go to the recipes.

~ Sahtein!

Lentil n Rice Mash aka Mjaddara

Mjaddara - Background

I make this dish when I want to travel back to my youth, to the days when someone else took care of me and cooked my favorite dishes, to a time when summers were spent at cousin's houses...walking downtown among colorful shops and busy streets... with multi-flavor ice cream cones in hand, and a string of relatives in tow.

Mjaddara tops my list of comfort foods. The warm, creamy texture and goodness of the lentils are incomparable. In Lebanon this is considered a peasant dish...I think it is King among lentil dishes!

 

Mjaddara

  • 1/2 c. organic Brown Rice
  • 2 c. organic Brown Lentils
  • 1/4 c. virgin Olive Oil
  • 2 large organic Yellow Onions, finely chopped
  • 2 tsp. Salt (or a little more to taste)
  • 2 c. hot water

Rinse rice and soak in water for 1 hour.

Pick through lentils, rinse bring to a boil. Cover and simmer for 15 minutes.onion saute

In the meantime, sauté onions in oil over medium heat until just golden.  Add the 2 c. hot water and boil 5 minutes over low heat.

Add to the cooking lentils along with the rice and salt.  Continue to cook over medium-low heat for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally with wood spoon.

Turn to low, cover and continue cooking for 15-20 minutes or until rice is done, stirring frequently to keep from sticking to bottom of pot. Consistency should be like a thick pudding.

Remove from heat and let cool for 15 minutes.  Then place 1 cups of the lentil mash in food processor and pulse 4 -5 times until mostly blended.  Return to pot and stir into remaining lentils.  (If you like your lentils whole, you may skip this step.)

Scoop Mjaddara into large bowl, or several smaller bowls. May be served hot (on cold days) or cold, accompanied by a green salad, pickles, radishes and fresh sweet onions.

Note: Traditionally this dish is eaten with pieces of pita bread folded into cones to form a scoop, then topped with a slice of onion, tomato or pickle!

mjaddara

~ To Your Health!